When in Santorini

Wine and dine.

It was an 8-hour ride aboard the big vessel, Blue Star Ferries. We left the pier in Athens at 0730am and arrived in Santorini at 3pm when the tides have turned and the sky, a solid blue dotted with white fluffy clouds. There was no sunshine on this day but the ride up the mountain to our hotel provided us with a sombre yet tranquil view of the volcano and the Aegean Sea. Our welcome drinks were a cup of coffee or tea, and a carafe of the local wine which is available for free, 24 hours. You’d wonder why there’s no complimentary water, but my guess is as good as yours because in Europe, a bottle of water costs more than an alcoholic beverage. (But hey, who’s complaining?) In the four days that we stayed in Santorini (and the 2 days in Athens), we merrily indulged on white and red wines anytime of the day that there wasn’t any room to whine or gripe (make sure to try the Visanto wine which is the island’s flagship grape). One night while perusing the sunset at Fira, we struck an interesting conversation with a local guy who later offered to buy a bottle of white wine from a convenience store. We drank in plastic cups and sat on a spot by a hilly area with the cold wind breezing by, while we talked the night away. I guess it’s typically Greek. Cheers to the maker of wine and giver of life!

Eat gyros.

Pita bread, roasted meat, tomato, onion, and tzatziki sauce = ‎€2 gyro, the works! Not only does it tastes so good, it is also filling and easy on the pocket. We ate it on most days and I still crave for it up to this day.

Know the bus schedules.

On days that we leave our languid state, we head out to the bus terminal and devise a plan for the day. In Santorini, time goes by so quickly and before you know it, another day has passed. The best thing with our location?— the terminal is just 10 mins. away and bus fare is less than ‎€3 per destination.

Visit churches.

On our way up the shops are the churches and monasteries that are open for visit. There was music playing at St. John the Baptist Cathedral and live singing from the nuns at the Monastery of Dominican Sisters. It’s cathartic praying while listening to hymns.

Wear your colours.

In my luggage was a yellow vintage dress (1970s?) straight from my mother’s closet and I wore it on the day when the forecast promised of sunshine and clear skies amid a 10 C degree weather. I paired it with a baby pink thick trench coat and leggings. Next day’s outfit was the powder blue long caftan-like dress, and the next day, a red bright long-sleeved blouse. Santorini is an ideal venue for OOTD photo-ops, most especially in summer where the sun will shine down on you like a spotlight. Leave your black outfits behind, let the colours lift you up.

Take a dip.

It was not the season to swim but we still took the bus to Akrotini to see the Red Beach. The sea was a shimmering, splendid sight and I wanted to be inside the picture, looking out. It just suddenly came, the need to connect and touch the ground so I stepped down the big rocks, took off my shoes, dipped my feet in the cold sea and sat motionless like one of the rocks.

Watch sunsets.

The main attraction in Santorini is the sunset. And it sets both in Oia and Fira with the same intensity. In Oia, you have to go up the winding alleys to get a better view, so we nestled on top of a hill along with other sunset-seekers. There was an applause when the sun showed its true colours and it was ahh-mazing and to die for. I couldn’t help but stare for minutes on end until it settled down. In Fira, the view was the caldera (a volcanic feature formed by the collapse of a volcano into itself, making it a large, special form of volcanic crater) and we easily found a spot as the surrounding areas are far apart from each other. In both sunset sessions, my heart was bursting with excitement prior the showdown and then settled to a complete state of trance when the sun was down. I reckoned that if I were to spend my last day on earth somewhere, it would here.